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Significance of Diwali (Deepavali) and Interesting facts

Posted by Notion Brook on October 27, 2016 at 10:40 AM Comments comments (1)




Why do we worship only Goddess Lakshmi on Diwali?

 Lakshmi Puja is performed on the following day of Amavasya, the new moon night. It is believed that Goddess Lakshmi’s destroyer form is active on this day and she will wander the earth in search of the cleanest house to destroy negative energies and offer blessings of fortune and prosperity.


What exactly is Narka Chaturdashi?

Narka Chaturdashi, or Chhoti Diwali marks the death of demon Karkasura. Who slaid him and why? Our very own Lord Krishna, because Narkasura had imprisoned thousands of daughters of saints and Gods in his harem. But why do we celebrate his death? His mother, Bhumi, declared that this day should be a day of festivities not mourning, so there you go!

 

In Ramayana & Mahabharatha

- Hindus across the world celebrate Diwali in honor of the return of Lord Rama, his wife Sita and his brother Lakshmana from exile of 14 years after Rama defeated Ravana. To honor the return of Lord Rama, Sita and Lakshmana from Lanka and to illuminate their path, villagers light Diyas to celebrate the triumph of good over evil.

- Diwali also celebrates the return of Pandavas after 12 years of Vanvas and one year of "Agyatavas" in Mahabharata.


Why do we wake up before dawn and burst crackers on Narka Chaturdashi?

 The slaying of Narkasura also symbolises driving away wickedness and negative energies out of your home. Waking up at dawn, followed by a fragrant oil massage by the matriarch of the family and then bathing is believed to cleanse your system and your surroundings on the first prahar (first unit of time). This is followed by crushing the fruit karat outside your house, which symbolises Narkasura. There is no historical or scientific explanation for why people burst crackers at dawn. So it’s safe to assume it is only for fun!

 

Why do people keep a small broom in the prayer house during Diwali?

It is a popular belief that Goddess Lakshmi likes cleanliness, and she will visit the cleanest house first. This is also the reason why the broom is worshipped on this day. 

 

Do thieves worship Goddess Kali on Diwali?

The second day of diwali, Choti Diwali, is also known as Kali Choudas, a day for thieves to worship Goddess Kali in hopes that the Hindu deity will protect them from the police. Astonished? A number of eastern states in India follow this custom.


 Earning your money and keeping it safe?

Along a similar vein, Hindu families will worship the deity Kuber, God of wealth, on Dhanatrayodashi, popularly known as Dhanteras, which is signified by dry coriander seeds and jaggery (dhane ani gool). Lord Kuber guides individuals who are not good at saving money even though they may have no problems earning it.



Source: Google, Quora

Interesting facts about Konark Sun temple

Posted by Notion Brook on July 3, 2016 at 6:30 AM Comments comments (0)


Konark Sun Temple is a 13th-century AD Sun Temple at Konark in Odisha, India.  A major part of the structure is now in ruins.  The temple is 35 km from Puri and 65 km from Bhubaneswar.




Here are 10 interesting facts about sun temple konark.

 

UNESCO World Heritage Site

 With distinctive model of antique architecture, Konark’s sun temple is the only unesco’s world heritage site in the state of Odisha India. The temple has also featured on various list of Seven Wonders of India.


Artistic Splendor and Engineering Efficiency

 King Narasimhadeva I, the best ruler of the ganga empire had built this temple, with the help of 1200 artisans from 1243-1255 ad (13th century).a regular period of 12 long years.

 

Chariot Based Construction

 The temple complex is in the shape of a gigantic chariot, having elaborately carved stone wheels, pillars and walls. Konark temple was designed in the form of a beautifully decorated chariot mounted on 24 wheels. Each wheel about 10 feet in diameter, and drawn by 7 powerful horses.

 

Black Pagoda

The monument was also called the Black Pagoda'(Kaala Pagoda) by the European sailors due to its dark colour. In contrast, the Jagannath Temple in Puri was called the White Pagoda. Both temples served as important landmarks for the sailors. Konark temple was built on the sea bank. But now the sea has receded and the temple is on small distance from the beach. 

 

Devoted To Lord Surya

 The temple worship lord Surya (the sun god).shaped like a giant chariot, the temple is famous for the beautiful stone carvings that cover the whole structure.

 

The wheels at sun temple Konark serve as exact sun dials and are inspiration for the modern time watches.

 The key attraction of the temple is its 12 pairs of wheels located at the base of the temple. These wheels are not normal wheels but show time as well – the spokes of the wheels make a sundial. One can analyze the exact time of the day by just looking at the shade cast by these spokes.

 

The science behind the construction

A massive magnet was placed at the temple top and each two stones of the temple are inserting by iron plates. The idol was said to have been floating in air due to the arrangement of magnets. The distinctive arrangement of the main magnet combined with the other magnets caused the main idol of the temple to float in air.

 

Instructing mortality

The konark sun temple has two huge lions on both side of the entry. Each lion is shown grave an elephant. Beneath every elephant lies the human body. Lion represents pride and elephant represents money. Problems faced by human beings shown in one shot.

 

Orientation on the shore

Every day, the sun’s rays would reach the Nata Mandir from the coast and reflects from the diamond placed at the center of the idol. During the colonial time, these magnets had been removed by the Britishers to get the magnetic stone.

 

Architectural marvel

 Each single piece of the konark sun temple is covered with statue consisting of deities, dancers, scenes of life at court, etc. Konark temple has its own separate appeal.


A worth visiting temple in one's life !

Ancient Indian text Baudhayana Sulba Sutra already contain Pythogoras Theorem explained

Posted by Notion Brook on May 21, 2016 at 8:15 AM Comments comments (0)



It is well known that Ancient Indians were well-versed with Mathematics, Astronomy, Physics  and many more.


Well known Pythagoras of Samos (5th Century BCE) was an Ionian Greek philosopher, mathematician, and has been credited as the founder of the movement called Pythagoreanism. 


Baudhayana Sulba Sutra, composed by Baudhayana (8th century BCE), contains examples of simple Pythagorean triples, such as: (3, 4, 5), (5, 12, 13), (8, 15, 17), (7, 24, 25), and (12, 35, 37). 


 

It is also referred to as Baudhayana theorem. The most notable of the rules in the Baudhāyana Sulba Sūtra says:

 


दीर्घचतुरश्रस्याक्ष्णया रज्जु: पार्श्र्वमानी तिर्यग् मानी च यत् पृथग् भूते कुरूतस्तदुभयं करोति ॥

 


dīrghachatursrasyākṣaṇayā rajjuḥ pārśvamānī, tiryagmānī,

cha yatpṛthagbhūte kurutastadubhayāṅ karoti.

 

 


Baudhayana Sulba Sutra also describes a statement of the Pythagorean theorem for the sides of a square: "The rope which is stretched across the diagonal of a square produces an area double the size of the original square."


It also contains the general statement of the Pythagorean theorem (for the sides of a rectangle): "The rope stretched along the length of the diagonal of a rectangle makes an area which the vertical and horizontal sides make together."


Also, Baudhayana gives a formula for the square root of two.




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